Yogesh Chavan

Yogesh Chavan

Super Useful Tips & Tricks for JavaScript Developers

Super Useful Tips & Tricks for JavaScript Developers

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Quick way to mask numbers using slice and ES8 padStart method

const creditCard = "4111111111114321"; // 16 digit credit card number
const lastFourDigits = creditCard.slice(-4); // get last 4 digits

// prepend * to lastFourDigits to make length equal to creditCard number length
const maskedNumber = lastFourDigits.padStart(creditCard.length, '*');

console.log(lastFourDigits); // 4321
console.log(maskedNumber); // ************4321

Execute an event handler only once

By passing { once: true } as the third argument to the addEventListener method, the event handler function will be executed only once.

document.getElementById("btn").addEventListener("click",
  function () {
    console.log("Button clicked!");
  },
  { once: true }
);

Update properties of an object using spread operator

const user = {
  name: 'David',
  age: 30,
  city: 'NY'
};

const newAge = 40;

const updatedUser = {
  ...user,
  age: newAge
};

console.log(user); // { name: 'David', age: 30, city: 'NY'}
console.log(updatedUser); // { name: 'David', age: 40, city: 'NY'}

Find the number of properties in an object

const user = {
  name: 'David',
  age: 30, 
  city: 'NY'
};

console.log(Object.keys(user).length); // 3

Get the last elements from the array

const numbers = [10, 20, 30, 40, 50];
const last = numbers.slice(-1);
console.log(last); // [50]

const secondLast = numbers.slice(-2);
console.log(secondLast); // [40, 50]

Note that, slice method is available for the array as well as string.


Three ways to check If the provided array is actually an array

In JavaScript, array is also an object so to check If it's actually an array or object you can use the following 3 ways. (Popular Interview Question)

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4];
  1. arr.constructor.toString().indexOf("Array") > -1
  2. arr instanceof Array
  3. Array.isArray(arr)

Get current timestamp

const date = new Date();
console.log(date.getTime()); // 1621708197268

The timestamp value is sometimes useful for generating unique values because the timestamp value is always different for every second.


Provide a dynamic key for an object using ES6 computed object property syntax

// old way
function getPairs(key, value) {
  var object = {};

  object[key] = value

  return object;
}

console.log(getPairs('name', 'Mike')); // { name: 'Mike'}
console.log(getPairs('age', '40')); // { age: 40}

// new ES6 way
function getPairs(key, value) {
  const object = {
    [key]: value
  };

  return object;
}

console.log(getPairs('name', 'Mike')); // { name: 'Mike'}
console.log(getPairs('age', '40')); // { age: 40}

Object destructuring

const user = {
 name: 'David',
 age: 30
};

// destructure user properties and use a `status` property with value `Married` If it does not exist
const {name, age, status = 'Married' } = user;
console.log(name, age, status) // David 30 Married

const person = {
 age: 30
};

// destructure `person` object and rename `name` to `username` and assign a default value of `Anonymous`, If the property does not exist in the `person` object
const {name: username = 'Anonymous', age } = person;

console.log(username, age); // Anonymous 30

Array destructuring

const days = ["sunday", "monday", "tuesday", "wednesday", "thursday", "friday", "saturday"];

const [firstDay, secondDay] = days;

console.log(firstDay); // sunday
console.log(secondDay); // monday

Using ES6 template literal syntax

const user = {
 name: 'David',
 age: 30,
 address: 'NY'
};

// old way: Hi, I'm David with age 30 and living in NY
console.log("Hi, I'm " + user.name + " with age " + user.age + " and living in " + user.address);

// new way: Hi, I'm David with age 30 and living in NY

console.log(`Hi, I'm ${user.name} with age ${user.age} and living in ${user.address}`);

This can be further simplified as shown below:

const user = {
 name: 'David',
 age: 30,
 address: 'NY'
};

const { name, age, address } = user;
console.log(`Hi, I'm ${name} with age ${age} and living in ${address}`);

Pass variable number arguments to a function

ES6 rest operator (...) converts comma-separated values into an array so the numbers parameter of the add function becomes an array.

function add(...numbers) {
 return numbers.reduce((acc, value) => {
   return acc + value;
 }, 0);
}

const sum = add(1, 2, 3, 4, 5); 
console.log(sum); // 15

Using spread operator to create a new array

const first = ["two", "three", "four"];
const second = [ "six", "seven", "eight"];

const combined = ["one", ...first, "five", ...second]
console.log(combined); // ["one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight"]

Fill the array with a specific value

const array = Array(5).fill(false); // [false, false, false, false, false]
const array = [...Array(5).keys()] // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Remove duplicates from the array

  • Using Set
const array = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 5];

const unique = [...new Set(array)];

console.log(unique); // [1, 2, 3, 5];
  • Using array filter method
const array = [1, 2, 2, 3, 1, 5];

const unique = array.filter((value, index) => {
    return array.indexOf(value) === index;
});

console.log(unique); // [1, 2, 3, 5]

Generate random number within a particular range

  • random number from 0 to 100:
Math.floor(Math.random() * 100)
  • random number from 1 to 100
Math.floor(Math.random() * 100) + 1
  • random number between min (included) and max (excluded)
function getRandom(min, max) { 
  return Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min) ) + min;
}

console.log(getRandom(10, 35)); // any random number >= 10 and < 35
  • random number between min and max (both included)
function getRandom(min, max) { 
  return Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1) ) + min;
}

console.log(getRandom(10, 35)); // any random number >= 10 and <= 35

const book = {"date": "2019–03–22","book": "Harry potter","author": "J.K.Rowling"};
console.log(JSON.stringify(book, null, 2)) // formatted with 2 spaces

formatted.png

const book = {"date": "2019–03–22","book": "Harry potter","author": "J.K.Rowling"};
console.log(JSON.stringify(book, null, '\t')) // formatted with tabs

formatted_tab.png


Implement smooth scroll to the top of the page

window.scrollTo({ top: 0, left: 0, behavior: "smooth" });

Convert any value to boolean

let number1;
console.log(!!number1); // false

const number2 = 10;
console.log(!!number2); // true

const name1 = 'Tim';
console.log(!!name1); // true

const name2 = '';
console.log(!!name2); // false

const nullValue = null;
console.log(!!nullValue); // false

This is especially useful If you want to avoid sending null or undefined as a value to the backend.


Quickly convert string to number

const number = "20";
const converted = +number;

console.log(converted); // 20

Convert string to array

const name = "Mike johnson";
console.log(name.split("")); // ["M", "i", "k", "e", " ", "j", "o", "h", "n", "s", "o", "n"]

const chars = "a,b,c,d,e,f";
console.log(chars.split(",")); // ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]

Format number to two decimal places

const number = 100.32222;
console.log(number.toFixed(2)); // 100.32

Check if the array contains a specific value

const numbers = [1, 2 ,3, 10, 50];

// old way
console.log(numbers.indexOf(3) > -1); // true as it check if 3 is present in the array

// new way
console.log(numbers.includes(3)); // true

The includes method is also useful when comparing multiple values at once.

const day = "monday";
if(day === "monday" || day === "tuesday" || day === "wednesday" || day === "thursday") {
  // do something
}

// The above code is the same as the below code

const day = "monday";
if(["monday", "tuesday", "wednesday", "thursday"].includes(day)) {
  // do something
}

Using optional chaining operator

const user = {
  name: 'David',
  location: {
    street: {
      number: 20,
      name: '11 wall street'
    }
  }
};

// old way
const streetName = user.location && user.location.street && user.location.street.name;
console.log(streetName); // 11 wall street

// new way
const streetName = user?.location?.street?.name;
console.log(streetName); // 11 wall street

Previously, to access the nested property we need to check for each property If it exists or not because directly accessing user.location.street.name will throw an error If the location or street property does not exist and we try to access name on it like this:

const user = {
  name: 'David'  
};

const streetName = user.location.street.name; // Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'street' of undefined

But now with the ES11 optional chaining operator, the next code after ?. will be executed only if the previous reference is not undefined or null so we don't get any error.

const user = {
  name: 'David'  
};

const streetName = user?.location?.street?.name;
console.log(streetName); // undefined

So using the optional chaining operator makes the code shorter and easier to understand.

Thanks for reading!

Want to learn Redux in detail and build a complete food ordering app? check out my Mastering Redux course.

Following is the preview of the app, we'll be building in the course. It's a great project you can add to your portfolio/resume.

Note that, in this app, I have used INR as the currency for displaying the prices but you can easily change it to USD or AUD or any other currency with a single configuration change in the app.

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